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Sunday, May 1, 2022

The May - June 2022 Communicator Periodical

 

130+ Pages Of Projects, News, Views and Reviews

'The Communicator' digital periodical of Surrey Amateur Radio Communications is now available for viewing or download at https://bit.ly/SARC22May-Jun

Read in over 140 countries now, we bring you Amateur Radio news from the South West corner of Canada and elsewhere. You will find Amateur Radio related articles, projects, profiles, news, tips and how-to's. 

This month antennas, connectors, fuses, circuit breakers and much more.

You can view or download it as a .PDF file from: https://bit.ly/SARC22May-Jun



Previous Communicator issues are at https://ve7sar.blogspot.com/search/label/The%20Communicator

As always, thank you to our contributors, and your feedback is always welcome. 

The deadline for the next edition is June 20th.

If you have news or events from your club or photos, stories, projects or other items of interest from BC or elsewhere, please email them to communicator@ve7sar.net

Keep visiting our site for regular updates and news: https://ve7sar.blogspot.ca    

73,

John VE7TI

'The Communicator' Editor






Monday, March 28, 2022

World Amateur Radio Day - April 18

The IARU

April 18 has been declared World Amateur Radio Day. It was on that day in 1925 that the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) was founded, during the International Radiotelegraph Conference in Paris. That is why radio radio amateurs worldwide celebrate this day with special activities every year.

The advocates of an International Amateur Radio Union were of the opinion that the shortwave spectrum that radio amateurs use to  transmit and to receive, could unite people all over the world, something that was assumed impossible. Therefore, this unifying action was undertaken.  In addition to protecting  and preserving frequency spectrum for the radio amateur, the IARU also strives to protect the  frequency spectrum of importance to other services. For radio amateurs, protection of our bands is of utmost importance, as shown through amateur response in countless emergencies and disasters worldwide.

Interest in  amateur radio has  only grown since those early days, with more than 3 million radio amateurs worldwide. Through this medium people from different countries and cultures could interact  with each other and  exchange ideas, long before there were facilities such as (mobile) phones, e-mail or social media.

And  amateur radio is still popular because you don't need a mobile network or internet  to  communicate. This is especially important to those in remote areas, those with outdoor interests such as hikers, off-roaders and hunters, emergency preparedness, as a hobby, or as an entry to a new career path such as electronics and communications. The service is, and always has been completely infrastructure independent. Radio amateurs are especially important  to maintain connections during disasters, in the event that regular communication channels  are no longer available. For example, the Amateur Radio Service kept agencies in New York City in contact with each other after their command center was destroyed during the tragedy of 9/11.

Radio amateurs were the first to discover that the HF spectrum  was not the wasteland that experts from those days branded it, but a tool that could support global communication. When the industry discovered that amateurs could successfully communicate worldwide on these shorter wavelengths, amateur radio was again in great danger of  being pushed aside. This led to the creation of the IARU. At the International Radio Telegraph Convention of 1927, amateur radio assignments were made that are  still  recognized today: 160, 80, 40, 20 and 10 meters. In the course of the years,  the IARU  has also worked to give radio amateurs new bands at 136 kHz, 472 kHz, 5 MHz, 10 MHz, 18 MHz, 24 MHz and 50 MHz, and a regional European allocation at 70 MHz.

The 25  countries that formed the IARU in 1925 have now grown to more than 160 affiliated associations in three regions. IARU Region 1 includes Europe, Africa, the Middle East and North Asia. Region 2 includes North and South   America and Region 3 includes Australia, New Zealand, the  Pacific Islands and most of Asia. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has recognized the IARU as the representative of the interests of radio amateurs.

IARU has member societies in countries shown in yellow

All radio amateurs are invited to go on the air on World Amateur Radio Day to explore our hobby, to promote it to family and friends, and within their interests.

Do you want to get involved? 

We offer our on-line courses about every 12-weeks. Further information is available at: https://bit.ly/SARCcourses

RAC “Get on the Air on World Amateur Radio Day” Special Event

On Monday, April 18, 2022, Radio Amateurs of Canada is once again organizing a special on-air event to celebrate World Amateur Radio Day.

Every year on April 18, Radio Amateurs worldwide take to the airwaves in celebration of Amateur Radio and to commemorate the formation of the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) on April 18, 1925. Radio Amateurs of Canada is once again holding a “Get on the Air on World Amateur Radio Day” special event in which we encourage as many Amateurs as possible to get on the air and contact as many RAC stations as possible.

  • RAC official stations will operate across Canada from 0000Z to 2359Z on April 18. The RAC official station call signs are VA2RAC, VA3RAC, VE1RAC, VE4RAC, VE5RAC, VE6RAC, VE7RAC, VE8RAC, VE9RAC, VO1RAC, VO2RAC, VY0RAC, VY1RAC and VY2RAC. 
  • Those contacting one or more of these stations will be eligible for a special commemorative certificate noting their participation in RAC’s Get on the Air on World Amateur Radio Day Event.
  • Participants simply need to complete one or more contacts, on any band and mode, with RAC official stations to earn their certificates.
  • No logs need to be submitted; simply check back on the RAC website when instructed and enter your call sign to download your certificate.

Sources: https://nationaldaycalendar.com/international-amateur-radio-day-april-18/,   https://1drv.ms/b/s!ApeN-l7qi2UFk3OAFuk8KTSq4Rti?e=LOohoE, and RAC “Get on the Air on World Amateur Radio Day” Special Event

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Monday, February 28, 2022

The March-April 2022 SARC Communicator

 

130 Pages Of Projects, News, Views and Reviews

'The Communicator' digital periodical of Surrey Amateur Radio Communications is now available for viewing or download at https://bit.ly/SARC22MarApr

Read in over 140 countries now, we bring you Amateur Radio news from the South West corner of Canada and elsewhere. You will find Amateur Radio related articles, projects, profiles, news, tips and how-to's. 

This month a special feature on 220 MHz, including its history and current state, including an antenna project for the band.

You can view or download it as a .PDF file from:  https://bit.ly/SARC22MarApr



Previous Communicator issues are at https://ve7sar.blogspot.com/search/label/The%20Communicator

As always, thank you to our contributors, and your feedback is always welcome. 

The deadline for the next edition is April 20th.

If you have news or events from your club or photos, stories, projects or other items of interest from BC or elsewhere, please email them to communicator@ve7sar.net

Keep visiting our site for regular updates and news: https://ve7sar.blogspot.ca    

73,

John VE7TI

'The Communicator' Editor






Friday, December 31, 2021

The January - February 2022 SARC Communicator

 

Over 120 Pages Of Projects, News, Views and Reviews

2022 here we come! 'The Communicator' digital periodical of Surrey Amateur Radio Communications is now available for viewing or download at https://bit.ly/SARC22JanFeb

Read in over 140 countries now, we bring you Amateur Radio news from the South West corner of Canada and elsewhere. You will find Amateur Radio related articles, projects, profiles, news, tips and how-to's. 

This month a special feature on CW, including its history, modern day mentions and how to best learn it.

You can view or download it as a .PDF file from:  



Previous Communicator issues are at https://ve7sar.blogspot.com/search/label/The%20Communicator

As always, thank you to our contributors, and your feedback is always welcome. 

The deadline for the next edition is February 20th.

If you have news or events from your club or photos, stories, projects or other items of interest from BC or elsewhere, please email them to communicator@ve7sar.net

Keep visiting our site for regular updates and news: https://ve7sar.blogspot.ca    

73,

John VE7TI

'The Communicator' Editor






Wednesday, December 1, 2021

The Galway Radio Club (Ireland) Newsletters

Good newsletters are hard to find!

Of course we're really partial to our own Communicator, but here are two great resources from our Ham friends in Ireland...

Galway Radio Club Newsletter: 

The Winter 2021 edition of the Galway Radio Club Newsletter has been published. This has become an annual favorite of Amateur Radio Operators not only in Ireland, but also around the world. It is a fantastic newsletter covering a wide variety of information. Read it here: 


Digital Radio Network: 

Steve Wright (EI5DD) has updated his Digital Radio Manual with a new version uploaded 09-Sep-2021.


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Wednesday, November 17, 2021

SARC-SEPAR November 10 Presentation on DMR

 Here is a guide to getting started on DMR

DMR stands for Digital Mobile Radio and is a European-developed international standard of digital radio. This new and versatile technology covers voice and data transmissions, along with conformance testing. It is an affordable digital solution to analog radio.

The only drawback is programming, which is more complex than standard amateur radio. DMR requires a 'codeplug' which is a file containing program information. With most analog ham radios you can convert a DMR code plug from one radio brand to another, using CHiRP for example. As mentioned during the presentation, every manufacturer seems to roll their own software, thus ensuring different nomenclature, and organization of their dialog boxes.

Its not for the faint of heart or for the beginner, so its best to consult someone in your area who may have a codeplug ready to go. For us that resource is Doug Pattengale VE7CQT, who gave an excellent PowerPoint presentation on the subject to a combined Zoom audience of SARC and SEPAR members. 

According to Doug, some of the worst radios don't include the ability to fully export or import the code plug elements so that tools like spread sheets can be used for bulk editing. There are tools 'out there' that facilitate this conversion from one proprietary software to another. For free! Have a look at this tool as it handles the TYT MD UV380 or 390 model in question. 

Doug has used it to convert an AnyTone code plug in the past, and he reports that its amazingly powerful and convenient. Once you get to know how it works, it can do in a few minutes what would take hours of work to manipulate in a spread sheet. An added benefit is that it compensates for missing functionality like sorting, re-ordering and cut / paste that the native CPS software lacks.

http://n0gsg.com/contact-manager/

- this is a stand alone .exe file. You just drop it into a folder and run it. No hidden files, overhead, install or uninstall. Just delete it, and its gone.

 



Here is a link to Doug's presentation:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1d4qRTKzhX46fFVagdHUq1UAy2SLNrc55/view?usp=sharing

And here is a complete guide to getting started in digital radio, courtesy of the Galway Radio Club:  Digital-Radio-Operating-Manual-v2.pdf (galwayradio.com)

~


Monday, November 8, 2021

Hedy Lamarr Day 2021

A special "HEDY LAMARR DAY NET"

For the 6th straight year N9H will celebrating HEDY LAMARR DAY on NOVEMBER 9, 2021. This special event net will be on at 9am pst to12pm EST, (1700 UTC). Help us celebrate her accomplishments and of course her 107th Birthday. As we celebrate her technological advancements in ham radio and of course her silver screen roles in many movies she did throughout her career.


Join us and have fun and check in to the Echolink *ROC-HAM* Conference server node #531091or Allstar node #2585,47620. The net which will run 4 hours or longer depending on the number of check-ins.

Here is the net control line-up for Tuesday, November 9th:

  1. 1700UTC TO 1900UTC/12PM EST - 2PM EST/ 9AM - 11AM PST - VA3ODJ/DESIREE - 2 HOUR SHIFT - NET CONTROL FOR ALASKA MORNING NET
  2. 1900UTC TO 2100UTC/2PM EST - 4PM EST/ 11AM - 1PM PST - TBD - 2 HOUR SHIFT2100UTC TO 2300UTC/4PM EST - 6PM EST/ 1PM PST - 3PM PST - - KD2GUT/CARYN EVE MURRAY – 2 HOUR SHIFT – AMATEUR RADIO NEWSLINE REPORTER
  3. 2300UTC TO 0100UTC/6PM EST - 8PM EST/ 3PM - 5PM PST - KI5OZZ/NANCY HOHLER- 2 HOUR SHIFT - NET CONTROL FOR THE BORDOM BREAKERS NET, NET CONTROL FOR THE HAM AND EGGS NET

Here is some great info about HEDY LAMARR you may not have known:

Hedy Lamarr: Facts about the actress and inventor!

  • Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler was born 9 November 1914 in Vienna, Austria-Hungary.
  • She became an internationally recognized film star, appearing in dozens of movies.
  • The lack of acting challenges bored Lamarr. She reportedly took up inventing to relieve her boredom.
  • Lamarr’s earliest inventions included an improved traffic stoplight and a tablet that would dissolve in water to create a carbonated drink. The beverage was unsuccessful; Lamarr herself said it tasted like Alka-Seltzer.
  • With the ongoing World War, Lamarr was inspired to contribute to the war effort, designing a jam-proof radio guidance system for torpedoes. With the help of composer George Antheil, they drafted designs for a new frequency-hopping, spread-spectrum technology that they later patented. That design is used to this day in radio and cellular telephone systems.
  • Lamarr and Antheil realized that radio-controlled torpedoes, which could be important in the naval war, could easily be jammed, thereby causing the torpedo to go off course.
  • With the knowledge she had gained about torpedoes from her first husband, and using a method similar to the way piano rolls work, they designed a frequency-hopping system that would continually change the radio signals sent to the torpedo.
  • Their invention was granted a patent on 11 August 1942 (filed using her married name Hedy Kiesler Markey). Yet, it was technologically difficult to implement, and at that time the U.S. Navy was not receptive to considering inventions coming from outside the military.
  • Only in 1962 (at the time of the Cuban missile crisis) did an updated version of their design appear on Navy ships.The design is one of the important elements behind today’s spread-spectrum communication technology, such as modern CDMA, Wi-Fi networks, and Bluetooth technology.
  • In 1997, they received the Electronic Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award and the Bulbie Gnass Spirit of Achievement Bronze Award, given to individuals whose creative lifetime achievements in the arts, sciences, business, or invention fields have significantly contributed to society.
  • She was featured on the Science Channel and the Discovery Channel.
  • In 2014, Lamarr and Antheil were posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.
  • Lamarr became a naturalized citizen of the United States at age 38 on 10 April 1953
  • Gertrud Kiesler put “Hebrew” as her race on her petition for naturalization as a United States citizen. She would live out the rest of her life in California, dying in 1977 at age 83.



A special event QSL Card will be available upon request. Just tell the net controller and they will put you down for one and of course to obtain your special event QSL Card.


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CQ CQ CQ

The May - June 2022 Communicator Periodical

  130+ Pages Of Projects, News, Views and Reviews 'The Communicator' digital periodical of Surrey Amateur Radio Communications is no...

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